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Heal Your Self (the movie)

Heal Your Self (the movie)

Heal Your Self speaks to some of the greatest authorities on health today who talk about Food and Nutrition, Emotional and Environmental Stress, The Power of the Mind, Self-Education, Meditation, Love, plus practical steps you can take.

Not really date night material – but it was definitely encouraging to see so many people able to do it, just by eating right and taking care of themselves. It’s not hard!  It’s free on Amazon Prime Video.

Heal Your Self speaks to a group of people who, when faced with serious illness, did just that. They decided to take their health into their own hands. They decided to take responsibility not just for their illness, but for their recovery.

Check out the trailer below:

The Antitumor Activity of Plant-Derived Non-Psychoactive Cannabinoids.

The Antitumor Activity of Plant-Derived Non-Psychoactive Cannabinoids.

Abstract
As a therapeutic agent, most people are familiar with the palliative effects of the primary psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa (CS), Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a molecule active at both the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor subtypes. Through the activation primarily of CB1 receptors in the central nervous system, THC can reduce nausea, emesis and pain in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. During the last decade, however, several studies have now shown that CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists can act as direct antitumor agents in a variety of aggressive cancers. In addition to THC, there are many other cannabinoids found in CS, and a majority produces little to no psychoactivity due to the inability to activate cannabinoid receptors. For example, the second most abundant cannabinoid in CS is the non-psychoactive cannabidiol (CBD). Using animal models, CBD has been shown to inhibit the progression of many types of cancer including glioblastoma (GBM), breast, lung, prostate and colon cancer. This review will center on mechanisms by which CBD, and other plant-derived cannabinoids inefficient at activating cannabinoid receptors, inhibit tumor cell viability, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and the stem-like potential of cancer cells. We will also discuss the ability of non-psychoactive cannabinoids to induce autophagy and apoptotic-mediated cancer cell death, and enhance the activity of first-line agents commonly used in cancer treatment.

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Full Article Here

Cannabidiol (CBD) induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells

Cannabidiol (CBD) induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells

Cannabidiol induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells by coordinating the cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy.

Introduction

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women in the United States (1). Conventional treatment options are often limited by toxicity or acquired resistance, and novel agents are needed. We analyzed the effects of the Cannabis sativa constituent, cannabidiol (CBD), a potent, natural compound with reported activity in breast cancer cell lines, and elucidated its effects on key neoplastic pathways.

CBD belongs to the cannabinoid family, a group of pharmacologically active compounds that bind to specific G-protein–coupled receptors (2). Phytocannabinoids are plant-derived products from Cannabis sativa; endogenous cannabinoids are made in animal and human tissues; and synthetic cannabinoids are laboratory produced. The G-protein–coupled receptor CB1 is found mainly in the brain and nervous system, whereas CB2 is expressed predominantly by immune cells (3). Recent data suggest that some cannabinoids also signal through the vallinoid receptor (4), whereas others may function in a receptor-independent manner (3). Cannabinoids can modulate signaling pathways central to the growth and spread of cancer. They inhibit cell-cycle progression and chemotaxis, and block angiogenesis (5). Recent studies have shown that cannabinoids also induce autophagic cell death (6). Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is one of the best-characterized cannabinoids; however, its therapeutic applications are limited by its psychoactive effects. We focused our work on CBD, a phytocannabinoid devoid of these properties (3).

Although CBD is reportedly effective against various tumors, its molecular mechanism of action is not fully characterized. CBD is cytotoxic to gliomas and inhibits tumor cell migration in vitro (7–9). In addition, CBD induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines by activating classical caspase pathways, and enhancing NOX4 and p22 (PHOX) function (10). A recent study reports that CBD inhibits breast cancer growth (11) and downregulates ID1, a regulator of metastasis in breast cancer cell lines (12). Furthermore, CBD, in conjunction with THC, induces programmed cell death (PCD) in glioma cells (13).

PCD, a cell suicide program critical to development and tissue homeostasis, can be classified according to the morphology of a dying cell. Apoptosis is a type I PCD involving caspase activation, phosphotidyl serine inversion and DNA fragmentation (14). More recently, autophagy, a process traditionally considered a survival mechanism, was also implicated as a mode of PCD, when excess de novo–synthesized, double membrane-enclosed vesicles engulf and degrade cellular components (15). The relationship between apoptotic and autophagic death is controversial (16). They may cooperate, coexist, or antagonize each other to balance death versus survival signaling (16). We found that CBD induced both apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells, and evaluated further the effects of CBD on the complex interplay between these 2 types of PCD in breast cancer cell lines. Characterizing more precisely the manner by which CBD kills breast cancer cells will help define the optimal applications of CBD as a cancer therapeutic.

Abstract
Cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychoactive constituent of cannabis, is considered an antineoplastic agent on the basis of its in vitro and in vivo activity against tumor cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism through which CBD mediates this activity is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have shown CBD-induced cell death of breast cancer cells, independent of cannabinoid and vallinoid receptor activation. Electron microscopy revealed morphologies consistent with the coexistence of autophagy and apoptosis. Western blot analysis confirmed these findings. We showed that CBD induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and, subsequently, inhibits AKT and mTOR signaling as shown by decreased levels of phosphorylated mTOR and 4EBP1, and cyclin D1. Analyzing further the cross-talk between the autophagic and apoptotic signaling pathways, we found that beclin1 plays a central role in the induction of CBD-mediated apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Although CBD enhances the interaction between beclin1 and Vps34, it inhibits the association between beclin1 and Bcl-2. In addition, we showed that CBD reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, triggers the translocation of BID to the mitochondria, the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and, ultimately, the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in breast cancer cells. CBD increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ROS inhibition blocked the induction of apoptosis and autophagy. Our study revealed an intricate interplay between apoptosis and autophagy in CBD-treated breast cancer cells and highlighted the value of continued investigation into the potential use of CBD as an antineoplastic agent.

 

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Dr. Brynzynski Offers Cure for Cancer; Meets with FDA

Dr. Brynzynski Offers Cure for Cancer; Meets with FDA

The FDA meets Dr Burzynski from Burzynski Cancer CURE Center.

This is a must see clip from the film on how cancer is completely cured with no radiation therapy or TOXIC potions from big Pharmaceutical industries at all. 100% success rate, and the lengths the FDA have gone to to try to put Dr Burzynski in jail

Watch Full Movie Here

Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski received much deserved publicity with the release of the 2011 film, Burzynski—The Movie. Eric Merola’s award-winning documentary showcased Dr. Burzynski’s remarkable cancer discovery for all the world to see, and explained how he won the largest and possibly the most convoluted and intriguing legal battles against the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in American history.

Dr. Burzynski’s story now continues in the compelling follow-up film: Burzynski—Cancer Is Serious Business, Part II. This second film details his continued struggles and victories, and explores the current status of Antineoplastons’ clinical testing—now (finally) sanctioned by the FDA.

Dr. Burzynski’s Cancer Treatment

By Dr. Mercola 
Dr. Burzynski, trained as both a biochemist and a physician, has spent the last 35+ years developing and successfully treating cancer patients suffering with some of the most lethal forms of cancer at his clinic in Houston, Texas. The treatment he developed involves a gene-targeted approach using non-toxic peptides and amino acids, known as Antineoplastons.

I personally interviewed Dr. Burzynski about his treatment in the summer of 2011. He coined the term “antineoplastons” and defines them as peptides and derivatives of amino acids that act as molecular switches. However, as genome research blossomed and science progressed, Dr. Burzynski discovered that antineoplastons also work as genetic switches. They actually turn off the genes that cause cancer (oncogenes), and turn on or activate tumor suppressor genes—genes that fight cancer.

His treatment strategy, which he refers to as “Personalized Gene Targeted Cancer Therapy,” includes mapping the patient’s entire cancer genome. This involves analyzing some 24,000 genes in order to identify the abnormal genes. Once they’ve determined which genes are involved in the cancer, drugs and supplements are identified to target those specific genes. Antineoplastons work on approximately 100 cancer-causing genes, but traditional oncology agents (including chemotherapy) may also be used, typically in combination with antineoplastons. This expanded direction of “personalized gene-targeted treatment” has permitted people who would otherwise be denied access to the still-unapproved antineoplastons to benefit from his treatment.

The War on Cancer Cures
So the FDA backs Monsanto and big pharmaceutical that is poisoning our people our children and this doctor that is trying to save people’s lives he gets punished? What’s your take? Comment below.